Weekly Film Recap #8 (Female Directors)

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This week we dove into the best of female-directed cinema over the years! While the Oscars love to make it seem like the men of the film industry dominate and destroy the sector, we see that that’s just not the case. From Maya Deren to Sofia Coppola, female directors have been making waves in the industry since the beginning of cinema. Here are just a few that we think have put together timeless pictures!

Me & You & Everyone We Know (2005)     (dir. Miranda July)   Miranda July’s quirky and independent ensemble film was her first effort as a director after spending quite a few years as a multimedia artist. Me & You & Everyone We Know  follows Miranda July as she plays an artist attempting to unite with a shoe salesman, but July interconnects a whole network of characters through their mutual desire to find connection with someone or something. July does an impeccable job at stringing together the various plotlines that weave through the film and through it, she displays how all people yearn for connection, no matter how different they may be.    3.5/5

Me & You & Everyone We Know (2005)

(dir. Miranda July)

Miranda July’s quirky and independent ensemble film was her first effort as a director after spending quite a few years as a multimedia artist.Me & You & Everyone We Know follows Miranda July as she plays an artist attempting to unite with a shoe salesman, but July interconnects a whole network of characters through their mutual desire to find connection with someone or something. July does an impeccable job at stringing together the various plotlines that weave through the film and through it, she displays how all people yearn for connection, no matter how different they may be.

3.5/5

The Virgin Suicides (1999)     (dir. Sofia Coppola)   Sofia Coppola, daughter of legendary director Francis Ford Coppola, made her film debut with  The Virgin Suicides  starring James Woods, Kirsten Dunst, and even a young 40 (Yes, Drake’s producer). Coppola takes the stress and despair that all teenage girls feel and pushes it to their extremes by placing the 4 beautiful Lisbon sisters in a religiously strict household. Coppola tells the story through the point of view of one of the young boys who lived across the street from the Lisbon’s, and through this, we’re able to fully understand the true impact of interpersonal relationships between young boys and girls.    3.5/5

The Virgin Suicides (1999)

(dir. Sofia Coppola)

Sofia Coppola, daughter of legendary director Francis Ford Coppola, made her film debut with The Virgin Suicides starring James Woods, Kirsten Dunst, and even a young 40 (Yes, Drake’s producer). Coppola takes the stress and despair that all teenage girls feel and pushes it to their extremes by placing the 4 beautiful Lisbon sisters in a religiously strict household. Coppola tells the story through the point of view of one of the young boys who lived across the street from the Lisbon’s, and through this, we’re able to fully understand the true impact of interpersonal relationships between young boys and girls.

3.5/5

Gas Food Lodging (1992)     (dir. Allison Anders)   Allison Anders’ film  Gas Food Lodging  is an incredibly personal film for her, as it touches on the universal struggles women find when trying to balance independence and their ‘need’ for a man. The film stars Brooke Adams as a single mother of two. Her eldest daughter (Ione Skye) loves to give her mom shit, while the younger daughter (Fairuza Balk) spends her days trying to find romantic connection for both herself and her lonely mother. Anders strategically places this family in a drive-thru town in New Mexico to highlight all the services (Food and Lodging) that most people traditionally find fit for women, but these three ladies are capable and dream of much more.    3.5/5

Gas Food Lodging (1992)

(dir. Allison Anders)

Allison Anders’ film Gas Food Lodging is an incredibly personal film for her, as it touches on the universal struggles women find when trying to balance independence and their ‘need’ for a man. The film stars Brooke Adams as a single mother of two. Her eldest daughter (Ione Skye) loves to give her mom shit, while the younger daughter (Fairuza Balk) spends her days trying to find romantic connection for both herself and her lonely mother. Anders strategically places this family in a drive-thru town in New Mexico to highlight all the services (Food and Lodging) that most people traditionally find fit for women, but these three ladies are capable and dream of much more.

3.5/5

The Loveless (1981)     (dir. Kathryn Bigelow)   Kathryn Bigelow found her stride with her film  Point Break  and shot off into the stratosphere after directing  The Hurt Locker  and  Zero Dark Thirty . But, before she leaned towards directing war films, she started off her career with  The Loveless . Coincidentally, Bigelow’s first film was also the first film role for the legendary Willem Dafoe! Dafoe plays a reckless 50’s biker whose gang is holding out in a small southern town after one of their bikes down. Like  Easy Rider ,  The Loveless  analyzes a counter-culture in society and shows the drastic contrast between the rebels and their surroundings.    4.5/5

The Loveless (1981)

(dir. Kathryn Bigelow)

Kathryn Bigelow found her stride with her film Point Break and shot off into the stratosphere after directing The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty. But, before she leaned towards directing war films, she started off her career with The Loveless. Coincidentally, Bigelow’s first film was also the first film role for the legendary Willem Dafoe! Dafoe plays a reckless 50’s biker whose gang is holding out in a small southern town after one of their bikes down. Like Easy Rider, The Loveless analyzes a counter-culture in society and shows the drastic contrast between the rebels and their surroundings.

4.5/5

We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011)     (dir. Lynne Ramsay)   Lynne Ramsay’s  We Need to Talk About Kevin  is an incredibly powerful character study of a mother who battles both inner and outer demons in the wake of the horrific tragedy her son has committed. Tilda Swinton stars as a has-been world traveler, Eva, now making ends meet by working in a travel agency. Ramsay chooses to tell the story in a non-linear structure that flashes both forward and backward in time while also dipping in and out of Tilda Swinton’s realities. Ramsay’s choice to tell this story in an unconventional manner serves to show the endless friction between Eva and her son Kevin, who’s been giving her loads of shit, practically since the day he was born. The structure also serves to build endless layers of suspense that don’t release until the dramatic climax centered on her sociopathic son.    4.5/5

We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011)

(dir. Lynne Ramsay)

Lynne Ramsay’s We Need to Talk About Kevin is an incredibly powerful character study of a mother who battles both inner and outer demons in the wake of the horrific tragedy her son has committed. Tilda Swinton stars as a has-been world traveler, Eva, now making ends meet by working in a travel agency. Ramsay chooses to tell the story in a non-linear structure that flashes both forward and backward in time while also dipping in and out of Tilda Swinton’s realities. Ramsay’s choice to tell this story in an unconventional manner serves to show the endless friction between Eva and her son Kevin, who’s been giving her loads of shit, practically since the day he was born. The structure also serves to build endless layers of suspense that don’t release until the dramatic climax centered on her sociopathic son.

4.5/5

Attenberg (2010)     (dir. Athina Tsangari)   Thanks to the likes of Yorgos Lanthimos, the US has started taking note of the very powerful and unique Greek Weird Wave movement we’re living through right now. Like her other Greek Weird Wave contemporaries, Athina Tsangaris uses strange and surreal storylines and characters to analyze the absurdities of human nature that we so easily take for granted.  Attenberg  stars Ariane Labed and even features her husband Yorgos Lanthimos in this story about a girl who is repulsed by human interaction and only finds peace in watching Attenborough nature docs and listening to Suicide. Once her father’s impending death becomes more real, she begins to experiment with human interaction in all forms.    3.5/5

Attenberg (2010)

(dir. Athina Tsangari)

Thanks to the likes of Yorgos Lanthimos, the US has started taking note of the very powerful and unique Greek Weird Wave movement we’re living through right now. Like her other Greek Weird Wave contemporaries, Athina Tsangaris uses strange and surreal storylines and characters to analyze the absurdities of human nature that we so easily take for granted. Attenberg stars Ariane Labed and even features her husband Yorgos Lanthimos in this story about a girl who is repulsed by human interaction and only finds peace in watching Attenborough nature docs and listening to Suicide. Once her father’s impending death becomes more real, she begins to experiment with human interaction in all forms.

3.5/5

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943)     (dir. Maya Deren)   In 1943, the independent trailblazer Maya Deren made one of the most unique and daring short films in cinematic history at the time.  Meshes of the Afternoon  has gone on to influence directors like David Lynch and it’s no wonder why. Directed by and starring Deren and her husband Alexander, this film follows a young woman living in an apparent dream world who continues to relive the same events over and over again. Visions of a grim reaper with a glass face, a flower, and a key allow Deren to create a true emotional and psychological experience that Freud would have had to commend. No excuses to skip this one though, you can literally go watch it RIGHT NOW on Youtube!    5/5

Meshes of the Afternoon (1943)

(dir. Maya Deren)

In 1943, the independent trailblazer Maya Deren made one of the most unique and daring short films in cinematic history at the time. Meshes of the Afternoon has gone on to influence directors like David Lynch and it’s no wonder why. Directed by and starring Deren and her husband Alexander, this film follows a young woman living in an apparent dream world who continues to relive the same events over and over again. Visions of a grim reaper with a glass face, a flower, and a key allow Deren to create a true emotional and psychological experience that Freud would have had to commend. No excuses to skip this one though, you can literally go watch it RIGHT NOW on Youtube!

5/5