2019 FILM OF THE DAY (WEEKLY RECAP #6)

This week we sort through some of the most important independent films of the 80s and 90s as well as a few more modern acclaimed films!

Man Bites Dog     (Benoît Poelvoorde, Rémy Belvaux, André Bonzel)    Man Bites Dog  is a French/Belgian mockumentary film and might be one of the most genius in the genre. Benoit, who also directed the film, stars as a man who goes around with a camera crew as he kills random people. This films threads the line between reality and fiction from start to end and most of its most gruesome aspects come from the ideas that all of it looks so real!

Man Bites Dog

(Benoît Poelvoorde, Rémy Belvaux, André Bonzel)

Man Bites Dog is a French/Belgian mockumentary film and might be one of the most genius in the genre. Benoit, who also directed the film, stars as a man who goes around with a camera crew as he kills random people. This films threads the line between reality and fiction from start to end and most of its most gruesome aspects come from the ideas that all of it looks so real!

The Master     (Paul Thomas Anderson)   Paul Thomas Anderson and his frequent collaborator Philip Seymour Hoffman worked together for the final time in their 2012 film  The Master . Hoffman stars as the leader of a religious movement called The Cause when a drunken man from the navy, played by Joaquin Phoenix, stumbles onto their ship and gets involved in this strange and shady cult. This films draws a lot of parallels to the history and ideas of L Ron Hubbard and his church of Scientology!

The Master

(Paul Thomas Anderson)

Paul Thomas Anderson and his frequent collaborator Philip Seymour Hoffman worked together for the final time in their 2012 film The Master. Hoffman stars as the leader of a religious movement called The Cause when a drunken man from the navy, played by Joaquin Phoenix, stumbles onto their ship and gets involved in this strange and shady cult. This films draws a lot of parallels to the history and ideas of L Ron Hubbard and his church of Scientology!

Stranger Than Paradise     (Jim Jarmusch)   Jim Jarmusch is widely acclaimed to be one of the greatest independent filmmakers of all time. His second feature  Stranger Than Paradise  is one of the finest examples of independent cinema there is and it’s not just because it was made outside of a studio with a shoe-string budget. Jarmusch was able to take the conventions of Hollywood films and flip them to focus completely on characters and forgetting about any real ‘plot’.

Stranger Than Paradise

(Jim Jarmusch)

Jim Jarmusch is widely acclaimed to be one of the greatest independent filmmakers of all time. His second feature Stranger Than Paradise is one of the finest examples of independent cinema there is and it’s not just because it was made outside of a studio with a shoe-string budget. Jarmusch was able to take the conventions of Hollywood films and flip them to focus completely on characters and forgetting about any real ‘plot’.

Safe     (Todd Haynes)    Safe  is one of the more intriguing and unsettling films I’ve seen since  The Killing of a Sacred Deer . Julianne Moore plays Carol, a bored housewife who believes she’s allergic to her environment. Everyone claims it’s just in her head, but she continues onto a new-age treatment facility called Wrenwood where we see Carol slowly lose her sense of sense. The film makes you wonder if she really was sick or if it was all just a cry for help from someone searching for an identity.   FILM OF THE WEEK

Safe

(Todd Haynes)

Safe is one of the more intriguing and unsettling films I’ve seen since The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Julianne Moore plays Carol, a bored housewife who believes she’s allergic to her environment. Everyone claims it’s just in her head, but she continues onto a new-age treatment facility called Wrenwood where we see Carol slowly lose her sense of sense. The film makes you wonder if she really was sick or if it was all just a cry for help from someone searching for an identity.

FILM OF THE WEEK

Fargo     (Joel & Ethan Coen)   One of my favorite Coen Bros films,  Fargo  is one of the most exciting independent films to come out of the 90’s for so many reasons. The idiosyncratic characters, snappy dialogue, and innovative narrative structure all give  Fargo  a timeless charm that most filmmakers can only dream of getting.

Fargo

(Joel & Ethan Coen)

One of my favorite Coen Bros films, Fargo is one of the most exciting independent films to come out of the 90’s for so many reasons. The idiosyncratic characters, snappy dialogue, and innovative narrative structure all give Fargo a timeless charm that most filmmakers can only dream of getting.

Trust     (Hal Hartley)   Another independent classic from the 90’s,  Trust  is Hal Hartley’s second feature and follows a pregnant, high school drop out who ‘kills’ her father with a heart attack after breaking the news. This film starts off as an off-beat comedy, but slowly molds into something a lot richer that makes you think about what ‘love’ really entails and why people need it. It’s quirky and in terms of structure, it’s actually quite innovative and fresh!

Trust

(Hal Hartley)

Another independent classic from the 90’s, Trust is Hal Hartley’s second feature and follows a pregnant, high school drop out who ‘kills’ her father with a heart attack after breaking the news. This film starts off as an off-beat comedy, but slowly molds into something a lot richer that makes you think about what ‘love’ really entails and why people need it. It’s quirky and in terms of structure, it’s actually quite innovative and fresh!

The Square     (Ruben Östlund)   Claes Bang plays Christian, a well-respected museum curator whose life starts to slowly fall to shambles after his wallet and phone get stolen. At the same time, he has a marketing team made up of millennials who post a controversial ad campaign without his approval, that sets off all the SJW’s and threatens Christian’s career.  The Square  won the Palme d’or at Cannes and while I honestly feel like I didn’t step away with much after the 2 and a half hours, I still find myself completely obsessed with these characters and this world that Swedish director Ruben Östlund has created… Also, the ape-man scene with Terry Notary might be one of the greatest scenes of the decade.

The Square

(Ruben Östlund)

Claes Bang plays Christian, a well-respected museum curator whose life starts to slowly fall to shambles after his wallet and phone get stolen. At the same time, he has a marketing team made up of millennials who post a controversial ad campaign without his approval, that sets off all the SJW’s and threatens Christian’s career. The Square won the Palme d’or at Cannes and while I honestly feel like I didn’t step away with much after the 2 and a half hours, I still find myself completely obsessed with these characters and this world that Swedish director Ruben Östlund has created… Also, the ape-man scene with Terry Notary might be one of the greatest scenes of the decade.