We're Living in the Twilight Zone

5 Times The Twilight Zone Predicted the Future
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With shows like Black Mirror, there's a lot to conjure up about how our future is going to look. But before them, there was The Twilight Zone and it just so happens that we're living in it now. Here are 5 times The Twilight Zone predicted the world we live in now.

1) Number 12 Looks Just Like You

(Plastic Surgery)
This episode is probably one of the more accurate and creepy premonitions that The Twilight Zone has given us. The episode revolves around a world where body and facial reconstruction is a basic part of being human and those who don't partake are essentially forced into it. While, no one's forcing anyone to go under the knife today, it's wild to see that such an insane concept 50 years ago is total commonplace today. I mean, we've all seen the Before/After pictures of Kylie Jenner and Nicki Minaj right?

This episode is probably one of the more accurate and creepy premonitions that The Twilight Zone has given us. The episode revolves around a world where body and facial reconstruction is a basic part of being human and those who don't partake are essentially forced into it. While, no one's forcing anyone to go under the knife today, it's wild to see that such an insane concept 50 years ago is total commonplace today. I mean, we've all seen the Before/After pictures of Kylie Jenner and Nicki Minaj right?

2) From Agnes - With Love

(Artifical Intelligence)
Goofy scientist, James Elwood is the protagonist of this journey into the Twilight Zone. Mr. Elwood finds himself in charge of a very advanced machine named "Agnes" that can compute answers to pretty much any question thrown its way. Sound familiar? It is then that Mr. Elwood falls victim to a very jealous Agnes that is sabotaging all of his chances with the girl of his dreams. This idea might sound familiar if you saw Spike Jonze's film "Her", which owes a lot of credit to this revolutionary episode. Kubrick even touched on this concept of machines having their own personal motives in 2001, when the astronauts AI "HAL" begins to control and off them because of it's own jealousy and motives. Rod Serling sums it up best when he closes the episode by saying: "Machines are made by men for man's benefit and progress, but when man ceases to control the products of his ingenuity, he risks losing the benefit." All I gotta say is Siri better pump the brakes if she thinks about pulling a fast one on me. 

Goofy scientist, James Elwood is the protagonist of this journey into the Twilight Zone. Mr. Elwood finds himself in charge of a very advanced machine named "Agnes" that can compute answers to pretty much any question thrown its way. Sound familiar? It is then that Mr. Elwood falls victim to a very jealous Agnes that is sabotaging all of his chances with the girl of his dreams. This idea might sound familiar if you saw Spike Jonze's film "Her", which owes a lot of credit to this revolutionary episode. Kubrick even touched on this concept of machines having their own personal motives in 2001, when the astronauts AI "HAL" begins to control and off them because of it's own jealousy and motives. Rod Serling sums it up best when he closes the episode by saying: "Machines are made by men for man's benefit and progress, but when man ceases to control the products of his ingenuity, he risks losing the benefit." All I gotta say is Siri better pump the brakes if she thinks about pulling a fast one on me. 

3) The Brain Center at Whipple's

(Displacement of Industrial Workers)
Mr. Whipple is the owner of a large manufacturing company that starts laying off its hard working employees in exchange for machines that can do their job for more than half the price. However, litte to Mr. Whipples knowledge, he too ends up becoming obsolete and replaced by a machine that can do his job just as well. Today we see countless examples of companies replacing their employees with efficient and cost-saving machines. Rod Serling's closing monologue of the episode should be viewed today as a warning: "Too often, Man becomes clever instead of becoming wise; he becomes inventive and not thoughtful; and sometimes, as in the case of Mr. Whipple, he can create himself right out of existence." Let's just hope they don't create some type of machine that can wipe my ass or else we're all doomed to obsolescence. 

Mr. Whipple is the owner of a large manufacturing company that starts laying off its hard working employees in exchange for machines that can do their job for more than half the price. However, litte to Mr. Whipples knowledge, he too ends up becoming obsolete and replaced by a machine that can do his job just as well. Today we see countless examples of companies replacing their employees with efficient and cost-saving machines. Rod Serling's closing monologue of the episode should be viewed today as a warning: "Too often, Man becomes clever instead of becoming wise; he becomes inventive and not thoughtful; and sometimes, as in the case of Mr. Whipple, he can create himself right out of existence." Let's just hope they don't create some type of machine that can wipe my ass or else we're all doomed to obsolescence. 

4) Static

(Streaming Platforms)
Ed Lindsey is an older man who's completely fed up with the current advertisements and "entertainment" that's running on tv. However, his whole world is flipped around when he discovers an old radio in the basement that plays all the hit radio shows and songs that he loved in his early days. Only issue is that every time he goes to show anyone else the music, it turns to static. An idea that was completely foreign in the 60's is now apart of our everyday lives. We have Youtube, Netflix, and Apple Music to transport us to any time in the past and when our wifi sucks and doesn't give it to us right away, we get pissed. Geez, how spoiled are we? I bet Mr. Lindsey would have killed for an iPod.

Ed Lindsey is an older man who's completely fed up with the current advertisements and "entertainment" that's running on tv. However, his whole world is flipped around when he discovers an old radio in the basement that plays all the hit radio shows and songs that he loved in his early days. Only issue is that every time he goes to show anyone else the music, it turns to static. An idea that was completely foreign in the 60's is now apart of our everyday lives. We have Youtube, Netflix, and Apple Music to transport us to any time in the past and when our wifi sucks and doesn't give it to us right away, we get pissed. Geez, how spoiled are we? I bet Mr. Lindsey would have killed for an iPod.

5) The Bard

(Ghostwriters & Poetic License)
This episode is a total dig at what Rod Serling believed and accurately predicted about the entertainment and television industry. Julius Moomer is a talentless screenwriter who finds luck after having William Shakespeare appear to him with the use of a little black magic. Moomer decides that Shakespeare is going to ghostwrite his newest project and he's going to present it. But, when Shakespeare pulls up the set and sees just how much they changed his work, he gets pretty pissed. Sure this episode is a little corny, but at its core it's depicting the very entertainment industry we latch ourselves onto daily. An industry where our most popular "artists" can't even play instruments or sing without autotune is exactly what Rod depicted for us here. No matter how substance filled a project may be, if that's not what will grab the public's eye then it should be changed. Substance and aesthetic has been put away in exchange for arousal and attention and we see it just as much today as ever. I mean, in a world where Lil Tay is practically a household name, how can this episode NOT ring true?

This episode is a total dig at what Rod Serling believed and accurately predicted about the entertainment and television industry. Julius Moomer is a talentless screenwriter who finds luck after having William Shakespeare appear to him with the use of a little black magic. Moomer decides that Shakespeare is going to ghostwrite his newest project and he's going to present it. But, when Shakespeare pulls up the set and sees just how much they changed his work, he gets pretty pissed. Sure this episode is a little corny, but at its core it's depicting the very entertainment industry we latch ourselves onto daily. An industry where our most popular "artists" can't even play instruments or sing without autotune is exactly what Rod depicted for us here. No matter how substance filled a project may be, if that's not what will grab the public's eye then it should be changed. Substance and aesthetic has been put away in exchange for arousal and attention and we see it just as much today as ever. I mean, in a world where Lil Tay is practically a household name, how can this episode NOT ring true?